Eleatic Ontology and Aristotle

Call for Abstracts

Deadline: February 15, 2019

 

Eleatic Ontology and Aristotle is Volume 1d of Eleatic Ontology: Origin and Reception, a multi-volume work on the development and influence of Eleatic ontology. This project is supported by the UNESCO Chair in Archai: The Plural Origins of Western Thought at the Universidade de Brasilia. The project’s aim is to gather in one place an account of Eleatic ontology, its first developments, and its lasting influence by soliciting scholarly articles from the international academic community. The resulting publications will be digital, open-access, and free of charge. The site will be hosted by the publisher of Universidade de Coimbra, Portugal: Imprensa da Universidade de Coimbra IUC.

Eleatic Ontology and Aristotle is edited by David Bronstein (Georgetown) and Fabián Mié (UNL Argentina). Confirmed contributors include: Lucas Angioni, Marcelo Boeri, Elisabetta Cattanei, Michel Crubellier, Rin Sirkel, Thomas Johansen, and Barbara Sattler.

For more information about the project see the post below.

Authors are invited to submit abstracts (500-700 words, better if combined with a shorter abstract) in English as a .doc, .docx, or .pdf file prepared for blind review. Please also provide, in a separate document, information about your affiliation and contact details. Both documents should be submitted to eonvol1@gmail.com February 15, 2019.

Eleatic Ontology: origin and reception

Volume I

 

Call for submissions

We invite submissions of proposals. Authors are invited to submit extended abstracts (500-700 words, better if combined with a shorter abstract) in English as a .doc, .docx, or .pdf file prepared for blind review. Please, provide also information about your affiliation and contact details in a separate file. All that should be submitted to eonvol1@gmail.com. See below the editorial project and all details for the submission.

Deadline for submissions of abstracts: December 31, 2018.
Dealine for submissions of articles: June 30, 2019.

 

Editorial project

The central idea of “Eleatic Ontology: origin and reception” is to gather in one editorial product a description of Eleatic ontology, its first developments, and its lasting and powerful influence on all western thought. The project will do this by inviting and drawing on scholarly articles from the international academic community. Despite the importance and influence of Eleatic ontology, as far as we know no work so far has set out to reveal its contours.

The work is divided into 4 major periods, each one receives one volume: 1) Eleatic ontology in ancient philosophy; 2) Eleatic ontology in medieval philosophy; 3) Eleatic ontology in modern philosophy; 4) Eleatic ontology in contemporary philosophy. Articles will be few but can be large enough to let authors explain  their thought in detail. The work is directed and coordinated by two General Editors: Nicola S. Galgano and Gabriele Cornelli.

 Volume I, “Eleatic ontology in ancient philosophy”. The Volume I is dedicated to Eleatic ontology in ancient philosophy. The first period is the one that receives most attention, for it treats Eleatic thought in its first impulses and in its reception at a time and place that were close to the ambience and mindset in which it was born. This work is divided in sub-periods, each one receives one Tome:

1a) Parmenidean ontology, including the work of the Eleatic school (Parmenides, Zeno, Melissus);

1b) Eleatic ontology and sophists and other schools (Megarians, pluralists etc.);

1c) Eleatic ontology and Plato;

1d) Eleatic ontology and Aristotle.

1e) Eleatic ontology and the Hellenistic period and late antiquity.

Language. The official language of the work is English. All articles are to be sent and published in English. However, current editorial technologies allow each article to be linked to translations in other languages, if the authors so desire. These translations will be supplied by the authors.

Selection. Papers will be selected by a combination of methods: some of the papers will be invited, and the others will be selected through a call for papers and a blind review. Selected papers will receive the approval of an Editorial Advisory Board, who will make the final selection and grant the authorization for publication.

Contributors (until now): Sara Ahbel-Rappe, Lucas Angioni, Luis Felipe Bellintani Ribeiro, Marcelo Boeri, Mathilde Bremond, Luc Brisson, Miriam Campolina, Giovanni Catapano, Elisabetta Cattanei, Michael Chase, Nestor Luís Cordero, Gabriele Cornelli, Michele Corradi, Michel Crubellier, Patricia Curd, Franco Ferrari, Giuseppe Ferraro, Marc-Antoine Gavray, Lloyd Gerson, Stefania Giombini, Daniel Graham, Thomas Johansen, James Lesher, Deyvis Deniz Machín, Emese Mogyoródi, John Palmer, Alba Papa-Grimaldi, Massimo Pulpito, Chiara Robbiano, Livio Rossetti, Barbara Sattler, Rin Sirkel, Panagiotis Thanassas, Franco Trabattoni, Simon Trepanier.

Editors. The Volume I is curated by the following editors:

1a) Eleatic ontology in Parmenides, Zeno and Melissus; eds. Dr. Nicola Galgano (USP, Brazil) and Dr. Rose Cherubin (GMU, United States).

1b) Eleatic ontology in sophists and other schools; eds. Dr. Miriam Campolina (UFMG, Brazil) and Dr. Stefania Giombini (UdG, Spain).

1c) Eleatic ontology in Socratism and Socratic schools; ed. Claudia Marsico (UBA, Argentina)

1d) Eleatic ontology in Plato; eds. Dr. Gabriele Cornelli (UnB, Brasil) and Dr. Olga Alieva (HSE, Russia)

1e) Eleatic ontology in Aristotle; ed. Dr. Fabián Mié (UNL, Argentina) and David Bronstein (Georgetown University).

1f) Eleatic ontology in Hellenistic period to  late antiquity; Dr. Christopher Kurfess (Pitt, United States); Dr. Anna Motta (Freie Universität Berlin, Germany).

The volume has two advisory editors: Dr. Manfred Kraus (University of Tübingen, Germany), and Dr. Massimo Pulpito (UnB, Brazil).

The publication. The publication is fundamentally electronic and will be open to the public and access will be free of charge. The site will be hosted by the publisher of Universidade de Coimbra, Portugal: Imprensa da Universidade de Coimbra IUC.

 

Call for submissions

We invite submissions of proposals related to any of the following areas:

a) Eleatic ontology in Parmenides, Zeno and Melissus.

b) Eleatic ontology in sophists and pluralists.

c) Eleatic ontology in Plato.

d) Eleatic ontology in Aristotle.

e) Eleatic ontology in Hellenistic period to late antiquity.

Authors are invited to submit extended abstracts (500-700 words, better if combined with a shorter abstract) in English as a .doc, .docx, or .pdf file prepared for blind review. Please, provide also information about your affiliation and contact details in a separate file. All that should be submitted to eonvol1@gmail.com.

Deadline for submissions of abstracts: December 31, 2018.
Dealine for submissions of articles: June 30, 2019.

 

Some guidelines for publication

All papers will follow the peer-review process. If accepted, the author is expected to correct the paper according to the suggestions of reviewers. Afterwards, the author will receive the first proofs and will only be able to correct typos and minor things. There is no further opportunity for rewriting, moving, completing or adding texts.

Submission of articles.

Length: In principle max. 50.000 characters, including spaces.

Language: English (preferably US English spelling). It is the responsibility of contributors whose native language is not English to ensure that their text is checked by an English proof-reader for accuracy.

Index/keywords: please provide together with your contribution a complete list of key terms mentioned in the main body (names of authors and works, places, important concepts) and an index of all the passages that are discussed in the main body.

Format of articles

– The contribution must be spaced 1.5 and not justified, with indentation for the opening of paragraphs.

– Standard font is Times New Roman (and a Unicode typography for Greek), with 12 pt. for text, 11 pt. for longer indented quotations, and 10 pt. for footnotes.

– Sub-headings must be placed at the center of the page in italics (please do not number or underline them).

– Footnotes should be numbered continuously and are added at the bottom of the page. Endnotes are not permitted.

– Single words, phrases or terms in Greek will generally be given in the original language and always include English translation between quotations marks. Frequently used terms (such as polis, arete), however, may be transliterated.

Translations: texts in Greek, Latin, or modern languages should be reduced to the minimum and must always be accompanied by a translation (one’s own translation, or an existing translation that must be cited exactly as it appears in print).

The complete guidelines will be provided to the authors of the selected articles.